Enterprise integration patterns gregor hohpe ebook


 

Editorial Reviews. From the Back Cover. Would you like to use a consistent visual notation for download. $ eBook features: . Gregor Hohpe leads the enterprise integration practice at ThoughtWorks, Inc., a specialized provider of application. Read "Enterprise Integration Patterns Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions" by Gregor Hohpe available from Rakuten Kobo. Enterprise . Gregor Hohpe. I am a technical director with the Office of the CTO ("OCTO") of Google Cloud where I combine my experience as Chief IT Architect at Allianz SE, .

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Enterprise Integration Patterns Gregor Hohpe Ebook

Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions. Front Cover. Gregor Hohpe, Bobby Woolf. Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Enterprise Integration Patterns provides an invaluable catalog of sixty- five. Enterprise Integration Patterns: Designing, Building, and Deploying Messaging Solutions Utilizing years of practical experience, seasoned experts Gregor Hohpe and Bobby Woolf show how ACM eBooks: The ACM Learning Center .

Shelves: programming , have-softcopy This book taught me, above all else, that I know squat about messaging systems. The reason I read this book was kind of silly. This book's cover with its red column on the right mocked me from my bookshelf, reminding me that I have failed to "collect them all" because of this one book. Why was it the only one in the series I hadn't read? Because it's a page book about me This book taught me, above all else, that I know squat about messaging systems. Because it's a page book about messaging systems. Reread that. The second longest book in the entire series, and it's just about messaging. Is it even possible to write pages about messaging patterns, I wondered? They're not that complex, right? You have a queue, something sends messages into the queue, something else pulls messages off to process them. Bing bang boom, run a JMS server and Bob's your uncle. Well apparently it's far more complicated than all that, and this book proves it. I had no idea there was so much to messaging beyond having some queues and using them to coordinate between a consumer and a producer.

Because it's a page book about messaging systems. Reread that. The second longest book in the entire series, and it's just about messaging. Is it even possible to write pages about messaging patterns, I wondered? They're not that complex, right? You have a queue, something sends messages into the queue, something else pulls messages off to process them. Bing bang boom, run a JMS server and Bob's your uncle.

Well apparently it's far more complicated than all that, and this book proves it. I had no idea there was so much to messaging beyond having some queues and using them to coordinate between a consumer and a producer. When I first looked at this book years ago, JMS and the like were sort of falling out of favor, but recently they've become en vogue again, so I decided it was time to finally check this one off the list.

I learned an absolute ton about messaging systems, channels, routing, filtering, transforming, design, and much more. And like most patterns books, the information was delivered in an organized, systematic way that gives me common terminology to use with other engineers.

(ebook) Enterprise Integration Patterns

I particularly liked the diagram of all the different kinds of Message Routers on page I realize how weird it is to call out a single page in a nearly page book, but I really liked it, it perfectly shows all of the different kinds of message routing patterns one might want to use, what they are called, and why you might want to use them, all with a single diagram. Very cool. This book is definitely worth reading for any sort of engineer doing "enterprisey" architecture-like work.

Messaging systems aren't going anywhere, and they have a lot of advantages. In today's increasingly asynchronous-focused architectures, they're more relevant than ever. The book is very dry and - as I've pointed out - almost hilariously long, but it's worth reading for sure. Oct 12, Ash Moran rated it it was amazing Shelves: I started reading this because while working on a small app using Event Sourcing, I realised I was building an increasingly complex messaging system and rediscovering a lot of design decisions I knew must have already been resolved.

My interest isn't in integration at all, but software built using messaging internally. This is a long book but surprisingly easy to read, and engaging enough to read cover-to-cover. It works up from fundamental primitives like Message, Message Endpoint and Message Ch I started reading this because while working on a small app using Event Sourcing, I realised I was building an increasingly complex messaging system and rediscovering a lot of design decisions I knew must have already been resolved.

It works up from fundamental primitives like Message, Message Endpoint and Message Channel, to fairly detailed, complex examples, like component failover controlled and monitored with messaging from a central management console. I now have a much clearer understanding of messaging patterns, which when I read documentation for modern messaging systems eg RabbitMQ , I can immediately see the design decisions that were made and the alternatives that exist.

I've known about this book for almost a decade, and I regret not reading it sooner. It basically describes OOP applied to software architecture, and there are many solutions to old projects I could have designed better if I'd recognised this from the patterns in this book. I highly recommend this to anyone working on a system with more than one non-trivial component, ie anything more complex than a basic CRUD webapp. View 2 comments.

I'll read this book with a different mindset about integration: Functional Composition. The same patterns can be applied in this context so it was definitely the worth the read for me to think on higher levels when developing functional programs.

Jan 22, Regis Hattori rated it really liked it Shelves: This kind of book that shows the subject in the format of patterns are very good when you have a problem, know that there are a set of patterns that can solve it but need a review of the pros and cons to decide which of them is better for your case. This kind of book is usually not good when you have a shallow knowledge in the subject my case because that is a lot of circular references: Despite this, I had no problem in reading it almost end-to-end.

First, because the major part of patterns has self-explanatory names. When I did not understand the pattern by its name, the diagram helped me a lot. When neither name nor diagram helped, I understood the core idea of the pattern in the first 10 lines of the chapter. Second, because there is an introduction chapter before each group of patterns that show us an overview of the next patterns.

Read Ebook Enterprise Integration Patterns Designing Building and D…

The majority part of the patterns presented is very well explained. At the beginning of each chapter, there is a short explanation about why the pattern is useful in a high level of abstraction. After that, there is a more detailed explanation comparing it to other patterns. Sometimes there is an implementation example in the end, but I did not read the major part of it because the book was written in and implementations tend to change more over time when comparing to the patterns itself.

But I read some of them just out of curiousity. Jul 08, Ronald rated it it was amazing Shelves: I wasn't really expecting to enjoy this book as much as I did but it is packed full of really useful information. I've worked on a few systems that used enterprise-level messaging and I thought I had a good handle on the space but I picked up the book anyway just to deepen my knowledge.

I am really glad that I did. It is very apparent that the authors have been involved in a variety of integrations and have managed to convert their experience into patterns. The book does a good job of balancing I wasn't really expecting to enjoy this book as much as I did but it is packed full of really useful information.

The book does a good job of balancing the explanation of the patterns and their combination into solutions. Given that there are numerous patterns to sift through, you will likely have to review the list when crafting a new solution to just to re-familiarize yourself with the possibilities.

The book can't tell you what solutions are right for your situation but it does a great job of making you think of the various aspects that need to be considered, such as configuration and control, security, logging and testing.

The examples bounce between Java and C but they should be readable by most developers. I highly recommend to anybody who is involved in any integration solutions.

May 26, Andrey rated it really liked it. Unexpectedly good reading but I found it only from the second try: Still correlates with modern approaches for distributed systems on top of SQS and similar solutions. Apr 07, Angad Nadkarni rated it it was amazing.

Very easy reading and perfectly organised as an enjoyable reference book. May 24, Maxim Dilovski rated it really liked it Shelves: Great book for Enterprise Architecture lovers. Totally recommend it.

Dec 04, Timothy Culp rated it liked it Shelves: Good introduction to enterprise messaging with many examples. Patterns tended to be repetitive and the same concepts kept coming up over and over again. Nov 17, Jason Stubbs rated it it was ok. Overly verbose, repetitive and clinical. The topics covered are good, but the book should really have been a third of the size. Nov 30, Skyhard rated it really liked it.

Jan 04, Justin rated it it was amazing Shelves: A must-read guide for any developer considering basic architecture and systems design. Feb 16, Andy rated it it was ok.

This book has not really stood the test of time in my opinion. The first chapter or two has some good definitions of components, and the penultimate chapter had a good example of implementation. The middle chapters will be interesting if you have never used modern queuing systems such as RabbitMQ, but bear in mind that modern systems implement a fair few of the patterns this book describes.

Feb 12, Eduardo Seabra rated it it was ok. It has some good information, but it's overly repetitive and has code samples thrown just to fill in the pages IMO.

I do not recommend it. Jun 28, Patryk rated it it was amazing. A very thorough compedium of integration patterns with a focus on messaging integration style. It is written in a very clear way, covering a wide spectrum of approaches oneself can face while pondering integration project within IT organization based on messaging. It covers 65 integration patterns and it introduces an iconic pattern language often called "GregorGrams".

Eac A very thorough compedium of integration patterns with a focus on messaging integration style. Each pattern description is followed by a use-case study of the problem it solves and one or more following examples.

Although there are plenty of other books presenting some of the concepts covered here, most of them focus on a particular middleware MOM platform family. EIP brings it all together in one place. Nov 15, Tom rated it liked it Shelves: I was debating whether to give this three or four stars and decided that it was a solid three.

Enterprise Integration Patterns

The book is well-written and very thorough over pages of content , but I do wish it had some more concrete examples with supporting code. Some of the patterns built on other patterns or were permutations of other patterns in the book, which got me wondering whether a solid understanding of the underlying principles in the Gang of Four book is the extent of the pattern knowledge you need, and this I was debating whether to give this three or four stars and decided that it was a solid three.

Some of the patterns built on other patterns or were permutations of other patterns in the book, which got me wondering whether a solid understanding of the underlying principles in the Gang of Four book is the extent of the pattern knowledge you need, and this information would allow you to naturally arrive at the patterns described in this book. Perhaps, but at the very least, this book codifies the knowledge a little more and provides good names for the patterns, allowing us to communicate designs more clearly.

I wouldn't recommend reading this book cover-to-cover, but it could serve as a great reference if you need to tackle some complex integration scenario or have some other enterprise messaging needs. Feb 17, Steve Whiting rated it liked it. There is a definite "book about patterns" pattern - introduce the concepts, a long section referencing things which haven't been defined yet, then a list all the patterns.

And, in fairness, this book does pretty much follow that pattern, although it's probably the most readable pattern book I've encountered so far - partly because it is basically well written, partly because it's a bit more up to date, and partly because it's very well structured and so has limited the 'forward reference' problem There is a definite "book about patterns" pattern - introduce the concepts, a long section referencing things which haven't been defined yet, then a list all the patterns.

And, in fairness, this book does pretty much follow that pattern, although it's probably the most readable pattern book I've encountered so far - partly because it is basically well written, partly because it's a bit more up to date, and partly because it's very well structured and so has limited the 'forward reference' problem as much as possible.

It also has a good walkthrough of a case study at the end, which leads you through the selection of appropriate patterns to solve specific problems.

It's slightly out of date, so it mentions evolving asynchronous web services, but doesn't really cover them. However, notwithstanding this, it's a very good book. Nov 16, Victor rated it it was amazing Shelves: Enterprise Integration Patterns is a timeless book. Although it's long, I found it to be easy to read and it's a good reference book. When I look at the messaging solutions that we use today, it's clear that they have been influenced by these patterns.

Solving Integration Problems Using Patterns. Integration Styles. Messaging Systems. Message Routing. Message Transformation. Interlude Composed Messaging.

Messaging Endpoints. System Management. Interlude System Management Example. Integration Patterns in Practice. Concluding Remarks. Messaging Channels. Message Construction. Interlude Simple Messaging.