Editorial Reviews. Review. One of the most entertaining books I have read in a long while. PAUL THEROUX is the author of many highly acclaimed books. “There are those who think that Paul Theroux is the finest travel writer working in English. This collection can only enhance that reputation.”—The New York. Editorial Reviews. About the Author. PAUL THEROUX is the author of many highly acclaimed books. His novels include The Lower River and The Mosquito.

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PAUL THEROUX is the author of many highly acclaimed books. His novels include The Lower River and The Mosquito Coast, and his renowned travel books. Dark Star Safari: Overland from Cairo to Capetown by Paul Theroux. Read online , or download in secure EPUB format. There are those who think that Paul Theroux is the finest travel writer working in English. To the Ends of the Earth by Paul Theroux. Read an download the Ebook.

Shelves: abandoned Only on page 60, but this, from page 51, is a good example of the problem I'm having with this book. When there was an exception, and I came across a handful, often in the unlikeliest places, the reader was passionate, with a house full of books, like an isolated bookworm in a Chekhov story. This is the first of his books I've read, and I have mixed feelings about it. Some of the stories he tells about the people he meets are interesting, but so far he's been pretty condescending about the white Southerners he's encountered pretty much uniformly described first as fat, then as having cartoonish accents. He seems more favorably inclined towards the black people he meets, who are all well-spoken and well-dressed. I get the feeling that he is visiting the South with a particular set of expectations, and he is finding what he expects to find. I also find it peculiar that he begins with a long rant about travel writers who complain about the challenges of travel in the United States, which he, as a world traveler, finds effortless, and then he goes on at length about the agonies of going through security checks for U. That's it. Every time I start to enjoy this, he says something that just irritates the heck out of me and I wonder why I'm spending my break with an "entertainment" read that's just making me mad. For instance He visits the University of Alabama and ponders the enthusiasm of Crimson Tide football fans. Now, I understand that the author of a travel book can't just Describe things, because then he'd be writing a Michelin travel guide; he has to draw some sort of Deeper Insights from what he observes. Still, it just seems as though everything Theroux sees is further proof for him of the guilt and inferiority complexes which are, he seems to think, defining characteristics of Southerners.

Now, I understand that the author of a travel book can't just Describe things, because then he'd be writing a Michelin travel guide; he has to draw some sort of Deeper Insights from what he observes. Still, it just seems as though everything Theroux sees is further proof for him of the guilt and inferiority complexes which are, he seems to think, defining characteristics of Southerners.

Mother Land (English Edition) eBook: Paul Theroux: osakeya.info: Tienda Kindle

In a state that is so hard-pressed, with one of the highest poverty rates in the nation, with its history of racial conflict, and with so little to boast about yet wishing to matter, it is natural that a winning team -- a national champion -- would attract people in need of meaning and self-esteem in their lives, and would become the basis of a classic in-group, The Tide was robust proof of social identity theory.

He sits behind two women "so beautiful that my gaze kept drifting toward them, and even when I was looking away the fragrance of their perfume warmed my face and made me smile, as though I was breathing their beauty" p Nice, right? I thought so. But then he has to spoil it with "the two lovely women in front of me were beaming, their heads thrown back, singing into their veils, their bodies twitching with pleasure beneath their silken dresses, and I had to remind myself that I was in church" p Now, this may be an instance of how just about Anything he says at this point will annoy me, but his lecherousness seems particularly out of place when he has been graciously welcomed into the church as a guest.

Oh, and Before the service, the church's bishop takes Theroux on a tour of Stillman College, and Theroux makes a reference to palmers in the Canterbury Tales because the bishop's name is Earnest Palmer, and he's a preacher : "You have the perfect name for a preacher.

Earnest Palmer. Like the line in Chaucer. I said, "Canterbury Tales.

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It seemed like news The Chicago Sun-Times Theroux is the thinking man's travel writer; in a seemingly casual, wandering fashion, he delivers a complete portrait of a continent's people, politics and economy. Bookpage Part of "Dark Star Safari" is pure entertainment; travelogue in a grand, epic style.

But Theroux also offers a sobering, contemporary look at the social and political morass in which much of Africa is mired. Sacramento Bee If you have even the slightest interest in Africa, travel, good writing, the modern world, the future, cities, nature, human society, love, courage--well, life in general--you are going to have to be called to the dinner table six times before you put this book down.

The Chicago Tribune I know and have traveled in Africa, so I can proclaim with admiration that Theroux, the disheveled, often grumpy, sometimes euphoric sojourner who shares his latest adventures in Dark Star Safari, is an intrepid traveler worthy of the reputation that precedes him. The Houston Chronicle opinionated but informed, and highly readable. Star Ledger A marvel of observation Theroux is near faultless in his expression of material about Africa, a continent where he taught 40 years ago, and which he clearly loves.

Buffalo News You won't find this trip advertised in travel brochures, but it's well worth taking vicariously. Atlanta Journal Constitution Neither a sensationalistic reveler in the pain of others, nor a hopeless romantic, Theroux chronicles a journey through an Africa full of decay and beauty, fear and joy, misery and perseverance.

It is an exploration of change, both in Africa -- its ruined cities, its confouding beauty -- and in Theroux's own life.

Austin Chronicle Have no fear, Paul Theroux is as grumpy as ever.

Dark Star Safari

A Entertainment Weekly Armchair travelers will wish the book went on twice as long -- and that is something, considering that the book runs more than pages. This is a masterwork by a master writer. Minneapolis Star-Tribune Paul Theroux. You need a better reason to read?

Figures in a Landscape

Boston Herald [Theroux] is at his writerly best when conveying the beauty and wonder of Africa. The Miami Herald A gritty lesson in history, politics, aid relief and tourism; a middle-aged man's meditation on life and travel; and, above all, a masterpiece of observations that makes sense of senseless chaos and staggering wonder.

Readers will be glad Therous made the trip. Playboy This new travelogue The Chicago Sun-Times Theroux is the thinking man's travel writer; in a seemingly casual, wandering fashion, he delivers a complete portrait of a continent's people, politics and economy. Bookpage Part of "Dark Star Safari" is pure entertainment; travelogue in a grand, epic style.

But Theroux also offers a sobering, contemporary look at the social and political morass in which much of Africa is mired. Sacramento Bee If you have even the slightest interest in Africa, travel, good writing, the modern world, the future, cities, nature, human society, love, courage--well, life in general--you are going to have to be called to the dinner table six times before you put this book down. The Chicago Tribune I know and have traveled in Africa, so I can proclaim with admiration that Theroux, the disheveled, often grumpy, sometimes euphoric sojourner who shares his latest adventures in Dark Star Safari, is an intrepid traveler worthy of the reputation that precedes him.

The Houston Chronicle opinionated but informed, and highly readable. Star Ledger A marvel of observation