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Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos series) by Dan Simmons. Read online, or download in secure EPUB format. Editorial Reviews. osakeya.info Review. On the eve of Armageddon, with the entire galaxy at Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos, Book 1) - Kindle edition by Dan Simmons. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Editorial Reviews. osakeya.info Review. On the eve of Armageddon, with the entire galaxy at Hyperion (Hyperion Cantos Book 1) - Kindle edition by Dan Simmons. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets.

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Dan Simmons Hyperion Ebook

Read "The Hyperion Cantos 4-Book Bundle Hyperion, The Fall of Hyperion, Endymion, The Rise of Endymion" by Dan Simmons available from Rakuten Kobo. Read "Hyperion" by Dan Simmons available from Rakuten Kobo. Sign up today and get $5 off your first download. A stunning tour de force filled with. The Hyperion Cantos 4-Book Bundle by Dan Simmons download the Ebook: . “Dan Simmons has brilliantly conceptualized a future years.

Aug 05, Pages download. Aug 05, Pages. Through four riveting novels, Dan Simmons masterfully weaves such influences as classical mythology, romantic poetry, and far-future philosophy into an ambitiously conceived and unfailingly entertaining epic. Now, for the first time, this entire masterpiece of the imagination is available in one extraordinary eBook bundle: There are those who worship it. There are those who fear it. And there are those who have vowed to destroy it. On the eve of Armageddon, with the known universe at war, seven pilgrims set forth on a final voyage to Hyperion seeking the answers to the unsolved riddles of existence. As the Shrike anticipates their mission, each traveler nurtures a desperate hope—and harbors a terrible secret. And one may hold the fate of humanity in his or her hands. In sheer scope and complexity it matches, and perhaps even surpasses, those of Isaac Asimov and James Blish. Dan Simmons, a full-time public school teacher until , is one of the few writers who consistently work across genres, producing novels described as science fiction, horror, fantasy, and mainstream fiction, while winning major awards in all these fields. His… More about Dan Simmons. Join Reader Rewards and earn your way to a free book! Join Reader Rewards and earn points when you download this book from your favorite retailer.

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Hyperion Hyperion Cantos 1 by Dan Simmons. On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits the creature called the Shrike. There are those who worship it. There are those who fear it. And there are those who have vowed to destroy it. In the Valley of the Time Tombs, where huge, brooding structures move backward through time, the Shrike waits for them all. On the eve of Armageddon, w On the world called Hyperion, beyond the law of the Hegemony of Man, there waits the creature called the Shrike.

On the eve of Armageddon, with the entire galaxy at war, seven pilgrims set forth on a final voyage to Hyperion seeking the answers to the unsolved riddles of their lives. Each carries a desperate hope—and a terrible secret. And one may hold the fate of humanity in his hands. A stunning tour de force filled with transcendent awe and wonder, Hyperion is a masterwork of science fiction that resonates with excitement and invention, the first volume in a remarkable new science fiction epic by the multiple-award-winning author of The Hollow Man.

Get A Copy. Mass Market Paperback , pages. Published March by Bantam Spectra first published May 26th More Details Original Title.

Hyperion Cantos 1. Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Hyperion , please sign up. Is there a prequel to this? The main character, "Consul" has no real history but the narrator keeps referring to incidents in his past. In addition, the planet is described as if we have been there before. Matt There isn't a prequel.

There are three more books, the second follows the events in this book and the back two take place several generations later. Simmons drops you right into his world with very little context or explanation as to who people are or what is going on. The confusion of the reader is shared by the characters. What's happening on Hyperion is a mystery on a grand scale, and this first book is a journey to try and figure out what in the world is going on there.

I remember being super confused for the first parts of the book, but then the adventure of piecing things together along with the characters was amazing. I am looking for a book maybe series that talks at some point about a woman with scythes for hands?

This front cover looks familiar but can anyone tell me if this is that book or something similar to search for? It fits, but it probably is Neuromancer. See all 16 questions about Hyperion…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Feb 08, Kemper rated it it was amazing Shelves: Simmons has been mashing up horror, sci-fi, hard boiled crime novels, thrillers, and historical fiction while often stuffing his books with so many ideas that it was all I could do to keep up so this seemed like it could be a bit more than I could comfortably chew.

Just as I feared, while I was reading and nearing the end, Simmons crept into my house like a ninja and rammed a funnel into my skull. Then he poured his wild sci-fi ideas and concepts into my brain pan like a frat boy pouring the suds in a beer bong.

My mind overloaded, and I gibbered like a monkey on meth for fifteen seconds before passing out. Keep reading and one of these days, I will END you! Simmons borrows the structure of The Canterbury Tales here. A powerful religion has grown around the Shrike and many make pilgrimages to try and see him from which almost no one ever returns. A former Consul of Hyperion is contacted by the Hegemony government and told that he must join a pilgrimage to see the Shrike with six others.

The Consul meets the other pilgrims which include a priest, a soldier, a poet, a scholar, a detective and the captain of a rare giant tree capable of space travel. Yes, a giant tree moving through space. Ask Simmons.

Realizing that they must have been chosen to make the journey for a reason, they take turns telling the stories of their connections to Hyperion and the Shrike as they make their way towards the Time Tombs. By using the different story tellers, Simmons gives different perspectives for tales as diverse as an interstellar war to a future detective story with big sci-fi action to quieter personal tragedies like a father losing his daughter to a horrible fate.

All of these stories eventually come back around to Hyperion and the Shrike. I was also impressed how Simmons writing this in foresaw a computer network linking people, but also turning them into information overloaded cyber junkies who confuse accumulating news with taking action. Oh, and memo to George Lucas: Or just hire Simmons to write the damn thing for you. My only gripe is that while I knew there were sequels to this, I thought I was getting a complete story, and it definitely leaves a lot hanging for the next book.

View all 43 comments. Apr 25, Lyn rated it really liked it. First of all, let me begin by saying that I really enjoyed reading Hyperion by Dan Simmons.

The depth, variety and scope of his imagination is a joy for any science fiction fan. Having said that, there were some flaws that must be addressed. The dialogue is frequently flat and there are some corny stereotypes that were fun but also distracting when the writer is trying to create a serious work.

The pace is also a problem. I had to invoke my rule to give any book at least pages before I set i First of all, let me begin by saying that I really enjoyed reading Hyperion by Dan Simmons. I had to invoke my rule to give any book at least pages before I set it aside. It was not until the halfway mark that I really began to download what Simmons was selling. Also frustrating is the thematic trend of science fiction and fantasy writers to write a series, to which Simmons subscribes.

This book is entertaining and enjoyable but is clearly meant to begin a series, the denouement is posted somewhere after the back cover. This is not necessarily wrong or a problem all by itself, but I do think it adds to a book to stand on its own. Certainly there are great series and books that are meant to be a part of a series, but as an artistic achievement and for literary significance, a novel should be able to be its own story, even if it is a part of a larger chronicle.

That said, Hyperion is a fun, smart book. Another fundamental aspect of a good science fiction book is the ability to illustrate a future setting. Simmons use of the Chaucer template allows him to explore several different settings in the future universe he has created, and it is a very good universe, reminiscent of Clarke, Asimov and Heinlein in its detail.

And I will read the next book in the series, Sam I Am, with a fox and in a box, because Simmons has created a very good book in Hyperion that will probably continue to be good as a series.

View all 67 comments. Seth Just finished it and I agree. Really wonderful science fiction. It's a 4. Other than that I might forgi Just finished it and I agree. I might forgive it when I finish the series. Jun 11, Kay rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: What in the world did I just read, and why didn't I read it sooner? This book is so superbly written and crafted—it's easily one of the best modern books I've read, one that excels in storytelling and writing!

If I could give this book more than five stars, I definitely, definitely would. The scope of imagination, wordplay, and critical analysis of humankind is astounding. I do think that the "frame" structure of the story, in which each character's tale slowly unfurls the plot, is superbly done. Each following story added a significant layer of depth to the book. I don't know if I can contribute any more than what has already been said about this book, so here are some of my reactions for each tale.

In that case, stop reading now …] -- - 1. The Priest's Tale: I am of the cruciform. I never really thought a series of a few words would ever cause me to break out in goose bumps. Not even "Come play with us, Danny" or "Hello, Clarice" or even "We know how monetary policy works" has elicited such a reaction. The priest's tale was powerful—a delicate mixture of horror and cleansing salvation. Even after finishing the book, I feel that the other stories don't match up to the urgency and suspense of the priest's tale.

Welcome to the rabbit hole that is Hyperion. The Soldier's Tale: This tale reached impressive heights in the beauty of its prose, and the irony of its conclusion. To put it crudely, the twist at the end of this story would probably top the episode charts of Punk'd , if Ashton Kutcher survived till the rise of the Hegemony.

I listened to Kassad's entire story on audiobook. The narrator had the perfect voice for a hard military man like Kassad who is lost in love. The Poet's Tale: Ah, this was probably my favorite story of them all. The potty-mouthed, frat house humor of this story, especially after Kassad's nostalgic and passionate tale, was a refreshing change.

In my mind, M. Silenus was one of the most developed characters of the book, with the exception of Sol Weintraub. Seriously, some days, I wish I could respond to queries M. Silenus was perfect in its execution—just circuitous enough to get into the "mad poet" mindset, but told with enough purpose to direct us along in its torrential journey to the final conclusion.

The Scholar's Tale: This was a well told, emotional story. It didn't affect me as much as it did other people, probably because I was more in the position of Rachel than Sol. Still, this story was the most approachable in plot and superbly crafted. The Detective's Tale: I haven't read many "whodunit" type of novels, and have never read any PI novels.

You know, the ones where the PI is some grizzled chain-smoking guy that sports a thick trench coat and a tattered pork pie hat. Please don't hurt me, I'm sorry! It took me a while to get into the story; Brawne Lamia isn't my favorite character. But it took off after a while, and the ending was satisfying, if not a little confusing. The Consul's Tale: Well, that came out of nowhere. But in a good way!

Unfamiliar terms made me nervous Time debt? Senate CEO?

View all 23 comments. Posted at Heradas Review This is another one of those classics of SF literature that I have somehow missed reading over the years. Thankfully, I finally got there, and Hyperion was not what I expected, in the best way possible. Obviously, coming into the novel my expectations were high, and I knew the m Posted at Heradas Review This is another one of those classics of SF literature that I have somehow missed reading over the years.

Obviously, coming into the novel my expectations were high, and I knew the most basic gist of the plot: What I got was partly what I anticipated, but in a very left-field form, which was such a refreshing subversion of my what I thought I was getting myself into. It delivered on what I thought it was, but in a way I never imagined, and it was fantastic.

Instead of straight-forward narrative momentum, Hyperion is almost entirely the backstories of these pilgrims. Each story genuinely adds to the forward narrative, by going backward. This is equally both. Each tale feels like a slightly different genre married to science fiction, and the interstitial sections weave them together tightly.

Only one of them fell slightly flat for me. Hyperion has that indescribable, almost lovecraftian terror, dread and brooding present throughout, and one tale in particular left me unbearably heartbroken. I was torn whether or not to dig straight into The Fall of Hyperion after finishing this, but ultimately I decided not to just yet.

View all 15 comments. Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn. Imagine a universe where the Earth has been destroyed and humanity is spread out across hundreds of planets. Combine the artful poetry of John Keats with a science fiction retelling of the Canterbury Tales.

Add tons of references to the myths and legends of the three Abrahamic religions, and what you have is Hyperion. A masterpiece of literature. Seven pilgrims come together aboard the treeship Yggdrasil to Deep in the shady sadness of a vale Far sunken from the healthy breath of morn. Seven pilgrims come together aboard the treeship Yggdrasil to make a journey to the remote planet Hyperion, outside the authority and jurisdiction of the Hegemony of Man.

Each and every one of them has been specifically chosen by the Church of Final Atonement to undertake a pilgrimage to the enigmatic creature known only as the Shrike. And each and every one of them has been chosen because of a personal connection with the planet itself. Thus begins a quest to uncover the lost secrets hidden within the Valley of the Time Tombs, a place from which no pilgrim has ever come back alive. This book deserves to be hailed alongside the greatest works of science fiction.

The most fascinating part of the book is definitely the mystery of the Time Tombs themselves, huge structures that supposedly move backwards through time, originating in a distant future. Thus the book explores the concept of time itself, and the unforeseen consequences the effects of the Tombs have had and will have on the pilgrims' lives and the universe as a whole.

Hyperion is more a collection of short stories with an overarching frame story than an actual novel.

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That structure is part of what makes the book so much of a joy to read. Every chapter has one of the pilgrims tell his or her tale to the others in order to share information that will be vital for their survival and the success of their mission. And each tale brings the group closer to the Valley of the Time Tombs, where the Shrike is waiting for them. All of them with a with a story to tell and a part to play.

Still singing loudly, not looking back, matching stride for stride, they descended into the valley. View all 26 comments. Mar 22, Megan Baxter rated it it was amazing. These stories are, individually, mind-blowingly good - in concert, they are little short of breathtaking.

This is science fiction at its very best, and its avoidance of simple answers satisfies me deeply. I can't wait to read the next book. The rest of this review has been withdrawn due to the recent changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement. You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook.

View all 22 comments. On the eve of interstellar war between the Hegemony of Man and the barbarian Ousters over the fate of Hyperion, seven pilgrims embark on a journey to the Time Tombs and their mysterious protector, The Shrike, a three meter tall, four-armed monster covered with blades.

One pilgrim will have his wish granted and the others will be impaled on the Shrike's Tree of Pain. Only one or more of the pilgrims isn't what he appears to be I first read Hyperion almost seven years ago as part of the The Hype On the eve of interstellar war between the Hegemony of Man and the barbarian Ousters over the fate of Hyperion, seven pilgrims embark on a journey to the Time Tombs and their mysterious protector, The Shrike, a three meter tall, four-armed monster covered with blades.

I first read Hyperion almost seven years ago as part of the The Hyperion Omnibus: When I found the ebook on the cheap, I decided it was time for a reread. Hyperion is an epic tale that's hard to quantify. Borrowing its structure from the Canterbury tales, Hyperion is a literary sf tour de force, encompassing much of what I love about reading in the first place.

There are literary references, far away places with strange sounding names, three dimensional characters, and a universe that is anything but black and white. There is also artificial intelligence, faster than light travel, robots, lasers, and many other spectacular sf concoctions. As I said before, Hyperion is really a multitude of tales in one. Seven people have been selected to go on what is possibly the final Shrike pilgrimage.

Along the way, they tell their stories, stories which run the gamut of genre tales. There's romance, humor, action, adventure, sex, and violence, everything I love about genre fiction. Simmons really flexes his writing chops in this, from Martin Silenus' verbose tale of being a writer to Brawne Lamia's Raymond Chandler homage. World-building is often intrusive and wielded like a club but Simmons' world-building is more like a massage, doled out in bite-sized chunks during each of the characters' tales.

While the world-building is staggeringly interesting, it's the characters that really fuel this fire. A repentent soldier, a conflicted diplomat, an old man with a child aging in reverse, the captain of a treeship, a burden-carrying priest, a detective in love with a poet, and a poet in love with the past.

There isn't enough space to write down everything I loved about this book. The only gripe I have is that it ends abruptly once the Consul's tale is told and the real ending is in the second volume, The Fall of Hyperion.

I originally read this way back in and it was one of those wonderful books that eclipsed many of the books before it. On the second read, it still is. Five out of five stars. View all 19 comments. Jan 28, Jonathan rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: I'm frankly terrified to review Dan Simmons' masterpiece Hyperion.

It is too good and too big for me to do this right. I thought I would mirror both Chaucer's and Simmons' use of the frame story in my review: The Pilgrimage is the perfect literary tool for bringing together a bunch of characters who appear to have little in common but soon all share the same goal. Simmons does a masterful job at telling each story in different styles. The feel is unique each time.

Buy for others

The structure of Hyperion offers something for everyone, even readers unfamiliar with sci-fi. Horror fans will be drawn to the legend of the Shrike, and the Priest's story, while perhaps the slowest to develop, reminded me of Stephen King. There's plenty to love for space opera junkies, and there's mystery, intrigue and deceit. There's also the exploration of the depth of a parent's love for their child. Oh and people get sliced and diced, nah huh. I'm not at home in a sci-fi or fantasy book unless I'm confused for at least the first few pages, if not longer.

The opening scene confronts us with new words "time-debt"? Read in retrospect, we feel very comfortable in this scene which is one I particularly like. That's good, and means we've integrated ourselves into Simmon's freaky world. Although the overarching story is definitely odd, by the end of it you've bought what Simmons is selling; at full price.

It's just odd enough for you to be curious, and there's just enough information revealed to encourage you to fly through the pages. Strange can be good, and in Hyperion, it's incredible.

Story Within a Story 1: I was delighted to learn that its his? The Shrike reminds me of Darth Vader on a few levels. It's Vader, like the Shrike, that dictates how the story progresses. The actions of all of the other characters are only in reaction to the Shrike. The protagonist in Hyperion is the Shrike; and it never says a word. However, I wouldn't classify it as an anti-hero because it certainly doesn't elicit any sympathy or other positive feelings. One difference: Actually, the opening lyrics to that song make a great pilgrimage tune for the Consul et al.: I digress.

The physical description of the Shrike is cool to mull over: It's metallic, but it's also organic. Don't forget the ruby red eyes. Come, come, commala Lord of Pain, come, commala. Story Within a Story 2: I have to admit that in a potty humour kind of way, I liked Martin's somewhat limited yet colourful vocabulary during his brain-damaged period.

Simmon's homage to George Carlin was pretty funny and reminded me of a scene in Iain M. Bank's Use of Weapons when a cab driver who uses a voice box to speak gets the crap kicked out of him and the voice box keeps saying things like "thank you", "where would you like to go" and "I'd like another please". Through Martin we get a glimpse of what happened to Old Earth.

Hyperion - Dan Simmons - Google книги

It was a creative method of exposition and obviated the need to have a character suddenly give a misplaced history lesson. Martin gives Simmons an excuse to answer the reader's natural curiosity. Story Within a Story 3: Dan Simmons has proven that he can not only tackle tech and space opera with aplomb, but that he can also create vivid characters with whom we no doubt identify.

I'm a new father and I found Sol's story to be extremely moving. Plus the freaking Shrike reaching for me in the dark would turn my shorts brown. Sol deserved the cover spot on my edition of The Fall of Hyperion. Don't doooooo iiitttttt!!!! Story Within a Story 4: If this was real, people like Britney Spears would have enough money for two such houses AND be stupid enough to actually own two.

Simmons does something with tech that I think a lot of authors fail to take advantage of: In the opening scene of Hyperion, we're aboard the Consul's ship with his piano. At some point in the story we're told that private ownership of space vessels is extremely rare.

I found this fact odd until we were introduced to farcasters and their relatively ubiquitous use. Kies je bindwijze Bekijk alle bindwijzen 7. Direct beschikbaar. Verkoop door bol. Ebook Op verlanglijstje.

E-book is direct beschikbaar na aankoop E-books lezen is voordelig Dag en nacht klantenservice Veilig betalen. Anderen bekeken ook. Dan Simmons Hyperion 4, Dan Simmons The Rise of Endymion 4, Dan Simmons Endymion 4, Joe Haldeman The Forever War 6, Mark Kalina Hegemony 0, Ishmael Angelo In a Carpenter's Overall 10, Bekijk de hele lijst.

Vaak samen gekocht. Nnedi Okorafor Binti: The Night Masquerade 3, Hans Rosling Feitenkennis 11, Umberto Eco De begraafplaats van Praag 8, Mary Higgins Clark Op een mooie zomerdag 7, In winkelwagen. Michael Wolff Fire and Fury 6, Hyperion by Dan Simmons Series: Hyperion Cantos No. Add to Cart Add to Cart. Add to Wishlist Add to Wishlist. A stunning tour de force filled with transcendent awe and wonder, Hyperion is a masterwork of science fiction that resonates with excitement and invention, the first volume in a remarkable epic by the multiple-award-winning author of The Hollow Man.

On the world called Hyperion, beyond the reach of galactic law, waits a creature called the Shrike. There are those who worship it. There are those who fear it.

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